Ol’ Waterworks

13 Jan

Good to a Fault by Marina Endicott made me cry, which I loved (I didn’t love being on the tube while I cried, because I didn’t want to wipe away my tears and get tube cooties, but c’est la vie).

I drank in every word of this perfectly true-to-life (but never boring) book, but admittedly, this was the part that made me cry, a scene between the dying mother Lorraine and her young son:

‘After you’re gone from sight, and can’t be seen, or be with us, will you still love me?’ Trying to get at the idea of dead without saying the word of dead.

‘Oh yes,’ Lorraine said. ‘I’ll love you forever.’

‘So will I,’ Trevor said.

I know, right? But I’m helpless against lines like this. Even thinking about Love you Forever by Robert Munsch makes me weepy (“As long as you’re living, my baby you’ll be”!!!!!).

Other instant tearjerkers include Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Patterson and the end of The Amber Spyglass by Philip Pullman (seriously, I thought I would never get over it).

This is by no means an exhaustive list, since any death scene will pretty much do it. I’m just including ones that did the trick even when I read them for a second or third time.

Don't even get me started...

Advertisements

10 Responses to “Ol’ Waterworks”

  1. Jackie (Farm Lane Books) January 14, 2010 at 2:13 pm #

    I’m really pleased that you enjoyed Good to a fault. I love it when books are powerful enough to move you to tears!

    • Lija January 16, 2010 at 12:36 pm #

      It can be pretty enjoyable. Have you read Good to a Fault yet?

  2. Lauren K. January 14, 2010 at 7:09 pm #

    Oh, the books that bring on the waterworks.

    “Peter Pan” gets me every time (because Wendy has to grow up and forgets how to fly! Oh, the cruelty!). “The Subtle Knife” by Philip Pullman (Lee Scoresby and his hare daemon Hester), “Firesong” by William Nicholson (part of the Wind on Fire trilogy).

    I’m pretty sure I sobbed my way through a couple chapters of “Little Women” (the second part, sometimes sold as a separate book called “Good Wives”). Sometimes, you just need to have a good weep.

    • Lija January 16, 2010 at 12:42 pm #

      When Beth dies? “I was never like the rest of you… making plans about the great things I’d do.” Ah!

  3. Sonja January 14, 2010 at 9:04 pm #

    Yeah, The Amber Spyglass still gets me every time. Same with The Subtle Knife.
    Philip Pullman is really good at making me cry.

    • Lija January 16, 2010 at 12:37 pm #

      Animals dying are pretty good at making you cry. Need I remind you of Jurassic Bark?

  4. savidgereads January 15, 2010 at 11:21 pm #

    Sometimes a good cry is as good as a good laugh!

    • Lija January 16, 2010 at 12:36 pm #

      Yes, but very few books actually do both, despite what some reviews may say! If anything, a book can make me laugh and also sort of depress me, but not cry.

  5. LisaG January 16, 2010 at 6:12 pm #

    A Complicated Kindness was like that for me…made me laugh, and depressed me, though I don’t know if I actually cried.

    The Horseman’s Graves made me cry a lot (no laughs). In fact, if I think about the ending too much, I’ll probably start crying right now. It sort of reminded me of a Sinclair Ross story, with lonely, misunderstood characters living out hard lives on the prairies. Super depressing, but really good book (in my opinion).

    I always like a dark story.

  6. missrandell January 16, 2010 at 11:01 pm #

    Oh man, I’m with you on Love You Forever. Others for me were Black Beauty (the part right after the fire in the barn), The Outsiders (God only knows), The Happy Prince and No Great Mischief.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: